Friday, May 10, 2019

What makes for a good aviation mechanic?

An aviation mechanic—also called aircraft mechanic or aviation technician—is a professional who diagnoses, repairs, and troubleshoots the engines, systems, and technology of airplanes. The role they play in ensuring optimum plane performance and guaranteeing pilot and passenger safety cannot be underestimated, says aviation and aerospace expert Scott Beale.
Image source: imagine-america.org
 In other words, aviation mechanics have to be good all the time. But with aircraft systems and controls now becoming more computerized and digitized, they’ve to have at least get an associate degree. Maintenance workers need to have a thorough educational background on computer repair and aviation flight instruments. Solid experience is a big plus, but even seasoned professionals need to contend with the influx of (and be familiar with) new aviation technology.

The FAA, of course, has clear and strict guidelines to this end, mandating aircraft maintenance to be performed or at least supervised by certified mechanics. Indeed, credentials are key to this line of work; in fact, distinct certifications are required for plane bodywork and engine work.
Image source: aircraftmechaniccareer.com

One way to ensure that hired mechanics completely know what they’re doing is to check their Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) ratings. For this, mechanics need to be fluent in English, having a full, 30 months of aircraft maintenance experience, and at least be 18 years of age. A known alternative to an A&P rating is the completion of the Aviation Maintenance Technician School program.

There’s also the Aircraft Electronics Technician (AET) program certification received through the National Center for Aerospace and Transportation Technologies. Finally, the FCC issues a radio-telephone operator certification for avionics technicians who plan on working on airplanes’ communication equipment. All in all, being a good aviation mechanic is mostly dictated by his or her gained credentials, adds Scott Beale.

Aviation and aerospace professional Scott Beale is responsible for piloting the successful business turnaround of Aerodynamics Inc. As its CEO from 2011 to 2015, Scott helped increase the company’s profitability with new business initiatives and diversification efforts. Visit this blog for more posts on aviation.

There have been a ton of new technologies and developments in aviation in recent years: from hybrid and electric propulsion, improved fuel economy, and blended wing designs to reduced emissions, more secure connectivity, and additive manufacturing. In this blog, aviation expert Scott Beale lists down common themes and threads to watch in the aviation and aerospace sector in the coming years. Air taxis: Expect prototypes and demonstration flights of air taxis from various manufacturers in late 2019. These planes include Kittyhawk’s Cora, Boeing’s Aurora, and Airbus’ Vahana. Even Uber is working on bringing its services to the sky with its own set of experimental air taxis. Electric flight: Various startups are racing to develop prototypes for short-travel aircraft, hoping to energize regional aviation. For now, green aircraft propulsion is still in the middle of hybrid-electric and fully-electric. But agencies and manufacturers like NASA, Airbus, and Zunum are keen on developing full-fledged electric planes which could take to the sky in the coming decade. Narrow-body aircraft : Boeing just launched its 797 line, a new midsize, narrow-body plane that’s aimed to replace both the 757 and 767. This coincides with the first flight of the aviation manufacturer’s new 777X, which features folding wingtips that permit the plane to fit into standard-sized airport gates, explains Scott Beale. Unmanned planes: Boeing is also at the forefront in building military-grade aircraft, as evidenced by its prototype MQ-25 Stingray. The unmanned plane, the product of a multi-million US defense contract, also features a carrier-based, aerial-refueling system. Aerospace and aviation professional Scott Beale was responsible for expanding FlightWorks from a $1.5 million-dollar business when he purchased it in 2000 to a $90-million enterprise when he sold the business in 2010. Visit this blogfor related posts.

There have been a ton of new technologies and developments in aviation in recent years: from hybrid and electric propulsion, improved fuel economy, and blended wing designs to reduced emissions, more secure connectivity, and additive manufacturing. In this blog, aviation expert Scott Beale lists down common themes and threads to watch in the aviation and aerospace sector in the coming years.
Image source: newzbase.com

Air taxis: Expect prototypes and demonstration flights of air taxis from various manufacturers in late 2019. These planes include Kittyhawk’s Cora, Boeing’s Aurora, and Airbus’ Vahana. Even Uber is working on bringing its services to the sky with its own set of experimental air taxis.

Electric flight: Various startups are racing to develop prototypes for short-travel aircraft, hoping to energize regional aviation. For now, green aircraft propulsion is still in the middle of hybrid-electric and fully-electric. But agencies and manufacturers like NASA, Airbus, and Zunum are keen on developing full-fledged electric planes which could take to the sky in the coming decade.

Image source: eurekamagazine.co.uk
Narrow-body aircraft : Boeing just launched its 797 line, a new midsize, narrow-body plane that’s aimed to replace both the 757 and 767. This coincides with the first flight of the aviation manufacturer’s new 777X, which features folding wingtips that permit the plane to fit into standard-sized airport gates, explains Scott Beale.

Unmanned planes: Boeing is also at the forefront in building military-grade aircraft, as evidenced by its prototype MQ-25 Stingray. The unmanned plane, the product of a multi-million US defense contract, also features a carrier-based, aerial-refueling system.

Aerospace and aviation professional Scott Beale was responsible for expanding FlightWorks from a $1.5 million-dollar business when he purchased it in 2000 to a $90-million enterprise when he sold the business in 2010. Visit this blogfor related posts.

Monday, April 15, 2019

A few insights on flight simulations and games

The aviation industry is constantly filled with new and exciting innovations, Scott Beale notes. Countless advancements, breakthroughs, and milestones in technology have benefitted human flight over the decades.

Image source: gamespot.com
One of the more popular innovations is the flight simulator. Helping keep pilots safe, flight simulation games play a big role in many flight school’s training programs. It’s a safe environment, and pilots get to figure out how to operate aircraft without risking damage to the machine or himself. Flight data can also be recorded, and simulations have been improved to become incredibly interactive.

Flight simulations can now simulate flight in extreme weather, which has given many aspiring aviators a huge relief. In these situations in the simulator, accurate safety checks can be performed.

Image source: britishairways.com
However, many flight instructors caution pilots to not get too used to simulators, which is only natural. The actual experience of flying a plane is still very much different. Even researchers have found that the brain benefits a lot more from real-world experience compared to simulations.

In conclusion, while flight simulations and games are great training tools, they are just that. These programs are simply supplementary to one’s training to become a full-fledged pilot, notes Scott Beale.

Aviation expert Scott Beale is skilled in commercial sales and products marketing, government contracting, and business startups. He led Aerodynamics Inc., The Paulding Jet Center, Flightworks Inc., Mountain Aviation, and AVTech Executive Flight Center to their most successful years in the aviation industry. For more info on Mr. Beale’s work, go to this page.

IoT is transforming the aviation industry

Image source: multidots.com
The Internet of Things or IoT is drastically changing the way various digital devices work, allowing them to interact with one another seamlessly and smartly. And its impact is beginning to truly manifest in various industries including aviation, says aviation and aerospace technology expert Scott Beale. A report by research and advisory company Gartner noted that around 20 billion interconnected devices will be available by 2020.

Image source: biginsights.co
Airlines and airports are now seeing the potential of IoT to revolutionize the field, ushering in new opportunities to improve on the most important facets of both travel and aviation. From making operations more efficient to optimizing passenger experience, IoT is helping eliminate various long-running issues in the industry.

Almost all airline owners today are already convinced that IoT implementation will benefit management, customers, and third-party partners. This can come in optimizing basic concerns such as baggage tracking, with RFID technology allowing for expediting misplaced and lost item retrieval and doing away with long wait times. IoT will likewise allow for real-time data on planes, from cargo monitoring, flight arrival and departure information, to the anticipation of possible mechanical issues.

IoT is also proving crucial in fully automating the check-in process and in improving flight efficiency, adds Scott Beale. Airline companies know the big role passenger convenience plays in travel; doing away with tedious check-ins is a big plus to gaining service offering an advantage over competitors. IoT aids flight efficiency by allowing for precise navigation routes and quick access to fuel expense and waste data, which of course hugely benefit both airport and airline operators.

Aviation and aerospace professional Scott Beale is skilled in commercial sales and aviation products marketing, government contracting, and business startups. For related posts, visit this blog.

Monday, March 18, 2019

The connection between fuel economy and aircraft engineering

Scott Beale feels that he cannot stress enough just how important fuel economy is in the aviation industry. Over the years, engineers, researchers, and scientists have experimented, researched, and tried countless ways of creating fuel-efficient aircraft.

Image source: aviation.stackexchange.com
Jet fuel has been reported to be the leading source of energy used in the United States, as it takes up a little under half of the entire energy consumption. The amount of energy to come out of jet fuel in the U.S. is so staggering that the output of electricity, the second most-used energy source in the country, only amounts to less than half of that.

Researchers and engineers have looked to fuel efficiency in cars and other road vehicles to modify aircraft. Although there has been a bit of success in the area, jets still use a gallon of fuel for every half-to-quarter-mile, depending on the aircraft. To put things in perspective, Scott Beale mentions the current hybrid car which travels more or less 50 miles for every gallon of fuel.

Image source: airbus.com

While alternative sources of energy are still out of the question (no alternative energy source can come close to powering a Boeing 787), there are viable options that aircraft engineers are looking into. Biofuels is one of the leading alternatives, since not only is it good for airplane engines, biofuels are also great for the environment.

Aviation professionalScott Beale piloted the successful business turnaround of Aerodynamics, Inc., increasing the company’s profitability with new business and diversification efforts as its CEO from 2011 to 2015. For more aviation-related reads, visit this blog.

Fun facts about airplanes that you probably didn’t know

The airplane is one of the most important inventions of the 20th century, effectively transforming relations among nations and leading to the growth of the global economy and globalization. But while we tend to take this aviation marvel for granted nowadays, here are some facts and trivia that you probably didn’t know about the ubiquitous airplane, compiled by aviation specialist Scott Beale.

Image source: travelup.co.uk

Firstly, did you know that pilots and their co-pilots are not allowed to eat the same meals? While not mandated by the FAA, a lot of airlines actually impose this rule as a way to ensure that there’s always a healthy pilot on board just in case one meal gets tainted.


The air inside airplanes is close to the atmosphere of the middle of the Sahara. Yes, it’s that dry, caused by pressurized cabin air that’s kept below 20% humidity. This is why your throat feels like there’s sandpaper in it when you’re in the air.
Image source: thrillist.com

It’s actually impossible for passengers to lock themselves in a plane’s bathroom. You probably notice the switch for the lavatory turned off and on before takeoff and landing, and it’s up to flight controllers to flip it open at any time, so don’t get ideas like smoking in the toilet.

Finally, have you ever noticed that little hole in the bottom of a plane window? That’s called the breather hole, says aviation expert Scott Beale. It’s there to regulate the pressure, to keep warm air in and make sure that the outside pressure won’t break the plane’s inner pane.

Aviation expert Scott Beale has been working in the aviation industry for more than 20 years, successfully growing businesses which he acquired and founded. He has led various aviation firms in attaining growth in revenues. Visit this blog for other interesting reads on aviation.

Friday, January 11, 2019

Are supersonic business jets coming back?

Image source: beam.land
It’s not as though traveling in supersonic speeds is a new technology; it has been around for years, epitomized by the once-success of the now-retired Concorde jets. There’s even “Flight of the Conchords,” an HBO series that pays a pun-based homage to the demise of the famed business jet.


The main turbulence the Concorde eventually had to face is its lack of commercial viability. Now, however, certain leaders and forerunners in the aviation industry are keen on bringing back the technology and improving vastly on it. For example, the company Boom claims that it can reduce the price of supersonic flights by up to 75 percent. This effectively means flight costs will be no different from a business-class flight on a 55-seater plane.

Image source: maxim.com

Then there’s the Aerion S2 jet, a project being developed collaboratively by top aviation companies and backed by billionaire Robert Bass, who is valued by Forbes at $4.9 billion. The Aerion is, indeed, promising; it is a modification of the Boeing 737 GE engine core which can reach Mach 1.4 when in flight. It’s a huge leap from the current standard of Mach 0.9.


Most analysts and experts in the industry believe that what’s impeding the technology from being viable for commercial use is the general lack of suitable engines for sound fuel economy. Also, most high-end jet engine varieties are still limited to NASA and military fighter jet use.


Yet while the fuel consumption and its corresponding cost is a real issue, more and more companies worldwide are buying into the resurrection of the supersonic jet, believing that the demand exists. After all, we all want faster flights.


Aviation and aerospace professional Scott Beale is skilled in commercial sales and aviation products marketing, government contracting, and business startups. Check out this linkfor more aviation-related posts.